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A 501-(c)3 non profit, all funds go to artist members. I had a successful campaign here for a project I designed. Read about it here: http://axully.com/repetition-with-variations/
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Saturday, March 17, 2012

"Isabelle" Slideshow

This painting was done for the Moses Botkin Challenge for March 2012. It is an exercise in using a commonly attributed "Zorn Palette": Cad red lt, yellow ochre, ivory black and titanium white. These exercises are so important to understand how your selected palette of colors 'play' together.
"Isabelle"
14x11" Oil on Linen Panel
© Vicki Ross

My model is Isabelle Roché, who owns La Maison du Pastel in Paris. Very interesting story...Roché Pastels have been manufactured continuously since the late 1800's...used by Degas and other painters of the time.

I started with a color swatch ala Schmid, mixing two pigments and creating tones with T.White.


This is an in-between process I'm tentatively calling "Freestyle with Training Wheels", because I only did two sessions of Grisaille underpainting. "Compulsory" is with 7-8 layers of underpainting. Kind of reminds one of obsessive compulsive, doesn't it?

"Freestyle" is where I started learning to paint faces, with no grid, drawing, or underpainting. I'd be all the way to 'done' and realize that one of the eyes was 'out of drawing'. My new method is training me to be more accurate from the very first mark.

And, that, my fellow artists, is a good thing!

Had I started with more OCD, well, who knows? At least I know I can do Freestyle, just with less consistent results.

2 comments:

Mark Adams said...

Vicki, You really nailed this challenge! The hair was particularly nice. I really appreciated the slide show of your process. too. It's great to see how other artists work.

vickiandrandyrossart said...

Thanks, Mark! I had fun...These slideshows started in the beginning of my 'serious' painting life. I'd take in-process photos so I could see how I got where it was I got :) Now I'm just in the habit, and found that others like to see them.